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Anders Johansen. Profile picture.

Anders Johansen

Professor

Anders Johansen. Profile picture.

The Destruction Of Inner Planetary Systems During High-Eccentricity Migration Of Gas Giants

Author

  • Alexander Mustill
  • Melvyn B Davies
  • Anders Johansen

Summary, in English

mass close-in planets, despite the latter being exceedingly common. Two migration channels for hot Jupiters have been proposed: through a protoplanetary gas disk or by tidal circularization of highly eccentric planets. We show that highly eccentric giant planets that will become hot Jupiters clear out any low-mass inner planets in the system, explaining the observed lack of such companions to hot Jupiters. A less common outcome of the interaction is that the giant planet is ejected by the inner planets. Furthermore, the interaction can implant giant planets on moderately high eccentricities at semimajor axes <1 AU, a region otherwise hard to populate. Our work supports the hypothesis that most hot Jupiters reached their current orbits following a phase of high eccentricity, possibly excited by other planetary or stellar companions.

Department/s

  • Lund Observatory

Publishing year

2015

Language

English

Publication/Series

Astrophysical Journal

Volume

808

Issue

1

Document type

Journal article

Publisher

American Astronomical Society

Topic

  • Astronomy, Astrophysics and Cosmology

Keywords

  • stars:
  • planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability
  • individual (Kepler-18
  • Kepler-23
  • Kepler-58
  • Kepler-339)

Status

Published

Project

  • From pebbles to planets: towards new horizons in the formation of planets
  • Wallenberg Academy Fellow Project

ISBN/ISSN/Other

  • ISSN: 0004-637X